Take Advantage of Multiple Rule Styles and Types

Statement Rules

Statement Rules

  • Natural expression of business logic
  • Reads like a sentence and it’s just as easy to edit
  • Constructed with elements rather than ‘typed in’ as code
Truth Tables

Truth Tables

  • Combines a number of conditions into a single place
  • Can have more than one result

Example – a truth table can recommend different loan packages based on evaluating a number of conditions, such as job type, income, and loan amount.

Matrix Rules

Matrix Rules

  • Allows you to create two axes of decision trees
  • Each tree is evaluated and the result is the intersection of the two decision trees

Example – You can have a tree based on jurisdiction (rules about where something happens) and one based on financial assessment (rules based on customers financial profiles). The result is returned at the intersection of these evaluations (e.g., whether a loan offer is going to be extended).

 

Sequential Rules

Sequential Rules

  • A sequence of decisions and integrations where data passes from one step to another to produce an output
  • Can trigger actions or return data – just like any other type of rule output
  • Combining other rule types into complex rules where different statement, expression, and table rules can be run – their results combined are evaluated to return a complex decision
Business-Oriented Rules

Business-Oriented Rules

  • Make it even easier for your business analysts to construct and change rules
  • Configure the visual rules designer to match the data structure and language of your business analysts
  • Hide the “plumbing” (e.g., how a rule is called, what is done with the result) from the business analyst and instead present the rules in the context of the business concepts with which the business is familiar

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